This is meant to be a community resource, not a resource for any one specific situation. However, in the end, the asker is accepting the answer, which will relate to his take on the question. If there is more than one good/correct answer, what is the responsibility of the accepter to accept an answer.

On my question Must Compels be negative in FATE, looking at it in hindsight, I think the answer is based on who is running the game, and the flavour of fate that is being run, so yes and no are both valid answers, and there are two very good explanations of the reasonings behind them. I accepted the answer from @SevenSidedDie because it seemed right to me, but the answer from @Jadasc was also valid after talking to him about it, and his edits.

What is my responsibility in accepting an answer?

share

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Your responsibility is to accept the answer that most helps you. It's basically a way of marking for future visitors that "I went this way."

That said, I've seen a number of ways of dealing with two (or more) very closely competing answers:

  • Accept one answer, but upvote the other (effectively splitting "the points" for the answer).

  • Add a comment to the accepted answer linking to the runner up.

  • Add a comment to the runner up, indicating that you feel that it also does a good job of answering the question in a different manner than the one you accepted.

  • Edit one answer to include the other (if both seem incomplete).

  • Post your own composite answer, integrating multiple other answers.

This situation is one of the driving forces behind the voting system. Even if you pick "wrong" on your accepted answer, the community still has the opportunity to weigh in, and vote the competing answer up.

share
    
Thanks! That makes perfect sense! –  wraith808 Nov 4 '11 at 20:48
8  
Always make sure to up-vote good answers... your votes are free to use, and allow you to provide positive re-enforcement for good answers. –  Simon Withers Nov 6 '11 at 2:03
    
All good approaches. Don't let indecision prevent you from marking one as accepted; low accept rates may even hinder people from answering your later questions (it's often a sign of someone who drops a question and doesn't bother waiting around for answers). –  mxyzplk Nov 23 '11 at 14:39
    
@SimonWithers yes but they aren't exactly free, since you have a limited supply every day –  Lohoris Jul 29 at 7:15

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .